Dicamba resources for farmers

Using correct nozzles remains important when using glyphosate-dicamba crop-protection products. The photo at the top of the field-plot display shows what can happen if incorrect nozzles on applicators are used. (Photo by Mike Orso)
Using correct nozzles remains important when using glyphosate-dicamba crop-protection products. The photo at the top of the field-plot display shows what can happen if incorrect nozzles on applicators are used. (Photo by Mike Orso).
By Mike Orso

Illinois Farm Bureau (IFB) has rounded up a bunch of resources about some of the new crop-protection tools available to you this year. You can find them in a one-stop, online shop located on the organization's website at this link.

“This is a web landing page that we have designed especially for stewardship of new technologies this spring, the most notable being the dicamba-tolerant soybeans and the dicamba-based herbicides,” said Tamara Nelsen, IFB senior director of commodities. “We’re adding products to the site as they come along.”

Earl Williams, left, IFB board member and Winnebago County farmer, shows to RFD Radio Networks Rita Frazer his handheld wind meter. (Photo by Mike Orso)
Earl Williams, left, IFB board member and Winnebago County farmer, shows to RFD Radio Network's Rita Frazer his handheld wind meter. (Photo by Mike Orso)

You may want to pay careful attention to the links under “Stewardship” on the right-hand side of the web page. Nelsen said the new glyphosate-dicamba products have very specific application and use requirements.

“Tank cleanout, boom height, wind speed, nozzle selection – those are a very complicated set of instructions to follow,” she said. “We know that farmers here in Illinois can do that. We know that stewardship is on the top of their minds.”

CropLife America, the national trade group that represents crop-protection companies, and the Agricultural Retailers Association plan to offer a webinar on the importance of stewardship with the new technology on Thursday at 2 p.m. It will include Rick Keigwin, acting director of the EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs. To participate, register online at this link. The link also provides you with an opportunity to submit questions.

Content for this story was provided by FarmWeekNow.com.

top
top bottom