GROWMARK encourages dicamba diligence throughout application window

Crop protection manager says the company's applicators will follow label requirements and hopes farmers do the same.

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Leaf cupping on susceptible soybean plants is one potential symptom of dicamba drift.

(Photo courtesy of Marc Bremer)

By DeLoss Jahnke

A key best management practice to fighting emerged broadleaf weed pressures is to hit them when they are small. The larger they become, the harder they are to manage.

Farmers certainly don’t want weeds to go to seed and increase the potential for trouble in years to come. But what if weather conditions run in conflict with label requirements while the weeds keep growing?

It may be a hard pill to swallow, but the label is supposed to have the final say, GROWMARK Crop Protection Manager Jeff Bunting told the RFD Radio Network®.

“Read the label, and follow what it says,” said Bunting. “In terms of best management practices, the application timing, the wind speeds, the direction to sensitive crops, the nozzle type.”

Buffer and border management, he said, are also critical to protect sensitive crops, including not only specialty crops but also non-tolerant soybean varieties.

Tank-mix requirements also require different consideration than last year.

“Make sure that your tank mix is approved by product,” Bunting added. “It’s very important that the tank mix is approved according to label.”

Tamara Nelsen, Illinois Farm Bureau’s senior director of commodities, reminds applicators that there are different timing requirements this spraying season.

“No spraying between sundown and sunrise, because of the potential for inversion,” she said. “Number two would be adhering to weather requirements; winds must be between three and ten miles per hour.”

Nelsen said farmers also should have a Plan B in place. If the products containing dicamba can’t be used according to the label, there could still be another product farmers could use to fight weeds within the same time frame.

Content for this story was provided by FarmWeekNow.com.

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