Farmers encouraged to follow dicamba label rules

Proper stewardship of dicamba-based herbicides remains a key priority for Illinois Farm Bureau.

Spraying Soybeans _cr

Farmers must keep dicamba on target in 2018, or risk losing the technology. Warren Goetsch, Illinois Department of Agriculture deputy director, told the RFD Radio Network® that the label is the law and must be followed.  

“We need to demonstrate that we can provide the appropriate stewardship without adverse impact to surrounding areas,” Goetsch said. “Know where natural areas and susceptible crops are and be very selective about weather conditions.”

That means applicators, both private and commercial, must follow all label directions and minimize off-target movement of spray particles, said Aaron Hager, University of Illinois associate professor of crop science.

Strict adherence to label instructions is in the best interest of maintaining the availability of the technology, and no new herbicide modes of action lie on the horizon for agriculture, Hager added. Visit {bit.ly/DicambaManagement} to read Hager’s latest tips for proper dicamba usage.

Proper stewardship of dicamba-based herbicides remains a key priority for Illinois Farm Bureau. Nearly 11,000 farmers and other ag professionals have attended classroom training at nearly 150 events across the state. Online training programs are now available at {bit.ly/DicambaOnlineTraining}.

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) will be monitoring for drift damage to state parks, nature preserves and other habit this year. IFB Governmental Affairs staff and members recently discussed concerns about the monitoring with IDNR.

Lyndsey Ramsey, IFB associate director of natural and environmental resources, said IDNR staff will keep IFB informed of any findings and concerns. She further noted the Illinois Department of Transportation has advised farmers to take special care to avoid drift on new pollinator and monarch habitat along road rights-of-ways.  

Jim Taylor contributed to this story.

Content for this story was provided by FarmWeekNow.com.

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