IAITC helping students separate crias from kids

County ag literacy coordinators, left to right, Jane Jones, Edwards County, Melissa Lamczyk, Franklin County, and Maria Farris, Williamson County, list natural, physical and human resources needed to raise goats. Coordinators tested several new classroom activities during a daylong ag literacy workshop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

County ag literacy coordinators, left to right, Jane Jones, Edwards County, Melissa Lamczyk, Franklin County, and Maria Farris, Williamson County, list natural, physical and human resources needed to raise goats. Coordinators tested several new classroom activities during a daylong ag literacy workshop. Illinois Agriculture in the Classroom (IAITC) also shared new and upcoming classroom resources and materials with coordinators from around the state.

By Kay Shipman

Farmers who raise goats might have raised their eyebrows to learn “students” suggested snakes and cats as needed resources on their farms. Those were a few of the creative answers to the question, What are the physical, natural and human resources needed on a goat farm?

“You’re really working to get your kids thinking. It’s fun and competitive,” Laura Vollmer, Illinois Farm Bureau educational specialist, told her students, a roomful of county agriculture literacy coordinators. During Vollmer’s competitive, round-robin competition, teams vied for the most, unduplicated list of resources.

Coordinators also learned a young llama and alpaca is a cria and a young goat is a kid.

With new lessons and materials, IAITC will expand students’ knowledge about specialty animals, ranging from goats and llamas to ostriches and catfish. Students not only learn about specialty animal production around the country, but they also learn about each production of each species in Illinois.

Classroom materials include ag-related Terra Nova readers, which are similar to Terra Nova standardized tests. A four-page specialty animal reader relates the subject to math, science, social studies, language and writing.

“This (reader) is a great way to dive into junior high classes. ‘Yes, we can have these (specialty animals) in Illinois,’ ” Vollmer said.

To find general IAITC resources, visit Ag in the Classroom. To find the specialty animal Terra Nova reader, click here.

Content for this story was provided by FarmWeekNow.com.

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