Food Safety Training & Certification

Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP)

Program #1: HACCP Overview and Refresher Course

This training course is designed for meat facilities that are currently operating with functioning SSOPs and HACCP programs. The training will review Sanitation and HACCP regulations, discuss the seven principles of HACCP, and walk participates through the process of reviewing and improving existing programs. The course will involve a series of on-line sessions and opportunities for interactive sessions with the instructors. (Note: This class is not intended to teach individuals to develop and implement a new HACCP program.)
haccp register

Program #2: HACCP Certification program

The Illinois Farm Bureau, in partnership with Texas A & M, is pleased to introduce the HACCP Certification program. This online training course is designed for new meat facilities. The course will cover sanitation and HACCP regulations, and the steps needed to develop and implement a food safety program. The course will include a combination of online and interactive sessions beginning on February 15th and continuing through May 3rd. Dr. Kerri Gehring, Professor, Presidential Impact Fellow, Meat Science at Texas A and M, will be the course instructor.  

 

 If you have any further questions regarding this program, please contact tbunting@ilfb.org or kbgehring@tamu.edu

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HACCP and Illinois Farm Bureau

Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a prevention-based approach to the safe production, handling, and preparation of foods. This tried-and-true system combines best manufacturing practices, standard operating procedures, and sanitation processes for food production facilities to prevent foodborne illnesses in meat, poultry, and seafood. Biological, chemical, and physical hazards can be found in many manufacturing environments. By establishing preventative measures and implementing continual monitoring procedures to avoid such hazards, HACCP allows for the safe and uninterrupted production of food products.

Livestock farms, along with meat and dairy processing, contribute $14.1 billion annually in economic activity in Illinois and are responsible for 52,124 jobs throughout rural and urban areas of the state. Livestock creates demand for Illinois’ top two commodities, corn and soybeans, consuming an estimated 112 million bushels and 36 million bushels, respectively. Because of this, Illinois Farm Bureau is dedicated to building an understanding and awareness of HACCP guidelines for small livestock packers and processors and supporting small business owners in pursuing HACCP certification and continued education. The success of these businesses strengthens our food supply chain and local economies. Illinois Farm Bureau’s public involvement with and support of HACCP builds a resilient link between farms and consumers.


Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA)

FSMA

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